The basics of slow shutter speed photography

Slow shutter speed photography is great for achieving the best contrast between objects or people in motion and those that are unmoving. A camera’s shutter speed can be used either to capture motion and create sharp images or blur them, so that certain elements in the frame stand out for their unique, artistic look, says photography enthusiast Vijaya Prakash Boggala.

Image source: photography.bastardsbook.com

Photographers slow down the shutter speed to come up with images that don’t really exist in reality when viewed with normal eyes. Though they look surreal, the resulting shots are nonetheless beautiful and often haunting expressions and photo creations.

Most professionals will simply utilize the shutter priority mode on their cameras when aiming for slow shutter speed shots. In Nikon cameras, this is done via the S setting; for Canon users, it’s called the Tv or time value. They’d have to experiment with the camera’s f-stop to get the desired effect, depending on whether the shoot is being done in the daytime or at night.

Image source: capturelandscapes.com

Most experts would keep the ISO as low as possible in low-light situations, as the camera allows in more light when using slower shutter speed. Some would make use of the zoom lens to produce even more varied effects. All in all, slow shutter speed photography is fun and refreshing, making use of intentional blur to elevate photos from simple snapshots to what may amount to art in photography, Vijaya Prakash Boggala adds.

Vijaya Prakash Boggala has written a number of medical abstracts for scholarly journals. He likes working on DIY projects and doing photography during his spare time. More on Mr. Boggala’s work and interests here.

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